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Research Webinar Series

Parkinson Society BC (PSBC) recognizes research is the only way to understand the mysteries of Parkinson's disease. Research will lead to better treatments and a cure for Parkinson's.

Researchers funded by PSBC through Parkinson Canada's Research Program will share an overview of their research, discuss why their projects are important to understanding Parkinson's, and how other researchers can build on their work.

We welcome all individuals with Parkinson's to this webinar series, as well as their spouses and/or carepartners/caregivers.

Please note that separate registration will be required for each session.

Measuring Quality of Life: July 14

Measuring Quality of Life for People with Parkinson's

Dr. Ayse Kuspinar is a rehabilitation scientist working to develop a way to measure quality of life in people with Parkinson's.

Through interviews and conversations, Dr. Kuspinar is learning about what matters most to people with Parkinson's. This information will be used to design a questionnaire that will help healthcare professionals and policymakers guide decision making based on what people with Parkinson's value the most.

Registration for this session is now closed.

Date: Tuesday, July 14
Time: 10:00am – 11:00am
Capacity: Unlimited
Fees: Free

Brain Changes: July 21

Brain Changes: How Parkinson's Affects Dopamine in the Brain

Dr. Michele Matarazzo is trying to understand the pattern of dopamine loss in the brains of people with Parkinson's disease.

Using Positron Emission Tomography (PET)scanning, Dr. Matarazzo is able to see how the presence of dopamine changes in the brain as Parkinson's progresses, and its relationship with the distribution of symptoms in different body parts.

Registration for this webinar will close on Friday, July 17.

Date: Tuesday, July 21
Time: 10:00am – 11:00am
Capacity: Unlimited
Fees: Free

 

Register Now

Identifying and Predicting Parkinson's: July 28

Identifying and Predicting Parkinson's

Dr. Juan Li is assessing the ability of a mathematical model called the PREDIGT Score at differentiating people with Parkinson's from those without the disease.

Developed by Dr. Michael Schlossmacher, PREDIGT uses five factors known to contribute to Parkinson's to predict whether a person may have — or may be developing — Parkinson's.

Dr. Li and her colleagues hope the model will be used as a screening tool to help neurologists and general practitioners identify at-risk people before any motor symptoms develop.

Registration for this webinar will close on Friday, July 24.

Date: Tuesday, July 28
Time: 10:00am – 11:00am
Capacity: Unlimited
Fees: Free

 

Register Now